Instruments

Showing 1–12 of 17 results

  • A Mark of Grace

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/coslc-mark_of_grace.mp3"][/audio]

     

    Written to accompany Neal Plantinga’s sermon on Cain and Abel (Genesis 4:1-6) at the 2010 Calvin Worship Symposium and then revamped as a choral anthem for the first Lessons & Carols reading (Genesis 3:8-15), “A Mark of Grace” tells the whole human story–creation, fall and redemption–in the form of a lyrical ballad. You could say it’s a meditative musical meta-narrative.

  • Ave Verum Corpus

    $20.00
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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/ave_verum_corpus-1.mp3"][/audio]

     

    If your choir sings Mozart’s “Ave Verum,” this setting of the same text will provide some variety to your communion services. About the same difficulty level as the Mozart, it features a harp-like piano part, rich choral texture, and two short solos.

  • Blessed Be!

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/blessed_be.mp3"][/audio]

    The words of Zechariah take on a gospel flavor in this new setting of Luke 1:67-79. Performances can be scaled from an a cappella rendition to a full blown band version which includes rollicking piano, hip hop drum set, sizzling horns (trumpet, alto sax and trombone), and funky bass. For those of you who are more adventurous, it even includes the optional “Blessed Be Rap.” A sure way to get your Advent or Christmas concert smokin’!

  • Bread of the World

    $25.00
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    Reginald Heber’s classic communion text comes alive in this stirring musical setting. The simple soprano melody (optional solo) that begins the piece blossoms into a rich choral texture which is supported by the flowing piano accompaniment.

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    Every Valley

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/every_valley.mp3"][/audio]

    This tender jazz/pop ballad brings fresh, new insight into the timeless words of the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 40:1-5). It can be an effective companion to “Blessed Be!” because of its similar instrumentation (a cappella, choir and piano, or full band), but it could also compliment Handel’s “Comfort Ye My People” and “Ev’ry Valley Shall Be Exalted” from Messiah because of their shared text.

  • Feed Us, Lord

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/feed_us_lord-cos_choir.mp3"][/audio]

     

    This simple, reflective communion song focuses on the way Jesus feeds our hearts at the table. The congregational version of the song includes a piano part and has the option of three keys with modulations: C, D and F. Though your congregation will pick up the tune in no time, you may want to consider introducing it with the arrangement for SATB Choir and Piano.

  • Go Down, Moses

    $25.00
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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/go_down_moses.mp3"][/audio]

     

    If your church has a jazz band, you’ve got to try this swinging spiritual. The chart is scored for 2 trumpets, alto sax, tenor sax, trombone, flute (optional), and rhythm section. It’s easy enough for high school level players but will make them sound like seasoned pros.

  • I’ll Be a Witness to the Light

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/ill_be_a_witness.mp3"][/audio]

     

    Perfect for both Advent and Epiphany, this simple song of dedication has verses based on John 1:6-8; 19-28, 35-42, and 43-51. This was arranged by Michael Burkhardt in “From a Distant Home.”

  • In a Still, Small Voice

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/still_small_voice.mp3"][/audio]

     

    This quiet ballad uses I Kings 19:11-13 and events from Jesus’ ministry to reflect on hearing the still, small voice of the Lord in our world today. The song can be effectively led by a praise team or sung as an anthem by choir.

  • Jesus, Be Enough

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/jesus_be_enough-choir.mp3"][/audio]
    Most Christmas songs are all joy and confidence: Shepherds overwhelmed by angelic songs; Wisemen led by navigational stars. But if your life is at all like mine, those moments are rare. Instead, life is often accompanied by a soundtrack of doubt, missteps, and loss. “Jesus, Be Enough” asks the question: Is Jesus a sufficient gift even when Christmas miracles don’t occur? Will we trust God even when our prayers seem to go unanswered? It is a Christmas carol for the rest of us. [Above is a demo of the choral anthem and below is a version with guitar and cello.]
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/jesus_be_enough.mp3"][/audio]

  • Lo, How a Rose

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/02-Lo-How-A-Rose.mp3"][/audio]

    One of the most lovely songs of the Advent/Christmas season is turned into a tender jazz ballad. An oft omitted verse is included (“O Flow’r whose fragrance tender…”) and a short soprano solo provides extra vocal texture. This flexible choral anthem includes chord symbols for jazz combo, but it can also be sung a cappella, as in the recording above by the Heinz Chapel Choir of the University of Pittsburgh. The orchestral accompaniment is also flexible, allowing full orchestra or just the strings to support the sound of the choir and piano.

    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/lo_how_a_rose.mp3"][/audio]
  • Lord God, Now Let Your Servants Depart in Peace

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/lord_god_now_let_your_servant.mp3"][/audio]

     

    The Nunc Dimmittis, Simeon’s song of praise in Luke, is set to a flowing melody for congregation. What better benediction could there be at the end of a worship service than to join Simeon in saying “Let us depart in peace for our eyes have seen the Savior”?

Showing 1–12 of 17 results