Congregational Songs

Showing 181–192 of 246 results

  • Psalm 53: Fools Deny Their God within Them

    $5.00
    Add to cart
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/psalm_053-carlill-fools_deny.mp3"][/audio]

    Adam Carlill’s metrical rendering of Psalm 53, from his excellent Psalms for the Common Era, retains the Psalm’s difficult themes but uses language that allows us to enter into them more easily. My tune accompanies the text with a Baroque-flavor that is off the beaten path, but still accessible, with a simple melody surrounded by harmonies and a bass line that scurry to and fro with all the fury of Psalm 53’s evildoers. The final half verse shifts to a major key, letting the accusations and anger of the previous verses give way to a final note of hope.

    Sheet music for voice and piano.

  • Psalm 54: Save Me, O God

    $0.00$5.00
    Select options

    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/gay-psalm_54-save_me_o_god.mp3

    Doug Gay wrote this hymn trext on Psalm 54, a prayer for salvation from enemies. Indeed, life is full of people who get a thrill out of bringing others down a few notches: “Arrogant foes are attacking me; ruthless people are trying to kill me–people without regard for God.” The music echoes this urgent, yet confident prayer–vulnerable, but strong.

  • Psalm 55: Oh, That I Had Wings

    $0.00$25.00
    Select options
    [embed]http://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm_055-oh_that_i_had_wings.mp3[/embed]

    Psalm 55 is the plea of someone who has been betrayed and attacked by a former friend. Understandably, the Psalmist wants to beat a hasty retreat: “Oh, that I had the wings of a dove! I would fly away and be at rest.” Given the urgency of the Psalm, I wrote a tune that comes in short, breathless bursts, with harmonic twists and turns.

  • Psalm 56: O God, in Mercy Look to Me

    $0.00
    Add to cart
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/psalm_056-carlill-o_god_in_mercy.mp3"][/audio]

    This Psalm is a plea for mercy when being hotly pursued by enemies. Have you ever felt like David did when he wrote this–slandered, hunted, trapped? The Psalmist petitions God for deliverance, reaffirms his trust in God’s care, and throws in a few ideas about what God might want do to his enemies. Interestingly, the Psalm ends with a future/past tense statement of faith: “I will present my thank offerings to you. For you have delivered me…” Now that’s faith!

    This hymn is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 57: The Thunder’s Rage Is Roaring

    $0.00
    Add to cart
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/bluett-psalm_57.mp3"][/audio]

    Lyricist Kate Bluett does a great job of capturing a difficult Psalm. The first verse teases out the storm imagery that accompanies the famous “I will take refuge in the shadow of your wings.” The second verse focuses on the Psalmist’s foes who are laying traps. The third verse not only includes the beautiful “I will awaken the dawn with singing” of the original Psalm but concludes with the point that the temporary terrors of the night are momentary, whereas God’s love never ends.

    This song is mentioned in Greg’s podcast, “2021 Musical Year in Review.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 6: Lord, My God, Do Not Contend

    $0.00
    Add to cart
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/psalm_006-carlill-lord_my_god_do_not_contend.mp3"][/audio]

    Adam Carlill’s Psalm versifications in Psalms for the Common Era strike a fine balance between faithfulness to the Hebrew texts and singability for modern congregations. For Psalm 6,  I wrote a Celtic-style ballad, which feels to me like it’s sturdy enough to contain the harsher elements of the Psalm (“do not castigate and chide,” “Turn away from me my foes” ), but soft enough for phrases like “soothing touch and balm inside.”

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 61: Lead Me to the Rock

    $0.00$5.00
    Select options
    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/lead_me_to_the_rock.mp3"][/audio]

    Psalm 61 is both a cry for help and an affirmation of trust. This song tries to capture both expressions with its minor-key verse and its major-key chorus. These two demos model the song in two different styles: above is a driving rhythm for worship band and below is more hymn-style using the written piano accompaniment.

    [embed]https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/Ps%20061%20Lead%20Me%20to%20the%20Rock.mp3[/embed]

     

  • Psalm 62: Only God Can Save Me Now

    $0.00
    Select options

    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_062-only_god.mp3

    Psalm 62 famously begins with the words, “My soul finds rest in God alone; my salvation comes from him.” The Psalmist goes on to describe the many difficulties experienced in life–those who are attacking or extorting money–always coming back to the refrain, “My soul finds rest in God alone.” Scottish lyricist, Doug Gay, has given these words an introspective feel in his setting of the Psalm. They could almost be sung by a victim of abuse, crying to God for help. That’s the thing about the Psalms: they give words to things we may have not experienced, which may make us feel like we don’t need them–until we do.

  • Psalm 65: We Praise You, God, in Silence and Singing

    $35.00
    Add to cart

    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_065-rehearsal.mp3

    Bethany Cok and Josh Parks asked me to compose music for their wedding, and they chose Psalm 65 as the song’s text. It was a great choice: Psalm 65 is a Psalm of thanksgiving that was likely written for one of the harvest festivals; its focus on entering God’s house, keeping vows, and God’s blessing make it a beautiful fit for a wedding.

    This song is mentioned in Greg’s podcast, “Thanksgiving Brainstorms.”

    Score and parts for piano, voice, violins, viola, and cello. Purchase price allows you to print as many copies as you need for your ensemble.

  • Psalm 67: Let All the Peoples Praise You!

    $0.00
    Add to cart
    [embed]http://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm_67-let_all_the_peoples.mp3[/embed]

    This setting of Psalm 67 is in what I’ve dubbed a “modern medieval” style–stately but with a strong rhythmic spine. One of the interesting features of the song is that the verse mirrors the chorus, but one step up. This modulatory sleight of hand makes each return of the chorus sound inevitable but surprising.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 69: Have Pity, My God

    $0.00
    Add to cart

    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_69-have_pity_my_god.mp3

    David Diephouse wrote the text for this song, and he shares its origin story, of sorts:
    I recall hearing my mother relate a family legend about her grandfather, who was a trawlerman on the Zuider Zee. One day, his boat got caught in a sudden squall that left it capsized. While waiting to be rescued the crew kept up their spirits by singing the opening lines of Psalm 69. The story may or may not be partly apocryphal, but I like it.

    I love to hear stories about how people have used the Psalms in everyday life. It’s easy to see why a person adrift in the sea would recall the lines of Psalm 69, because they are the cry of a person drowning–fighting a flood of sorrow, betrayal, and fatigue.

    This hymn is a free download. If you sing this song in your church, please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 7: Arise!

    $0.00
    Add to cart

    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_7-arise.mp3

    Isaac Watts described Psalm 7 as “God’s care of his people and punishment of persecutors.” Indeed, the Psalmist makes some pretty explicit suggestions about how God might bring vengeance on enemies. But it is also full of vivid language like “save me or they will tear me like a lion” and “he who is pregnant with evil and conceives trouble gives birth to disillusionment.” So, while this is unlikely to be my big hit, I think my Psalm 7 song does a good job of letting the text speak. Or as I like to say: This is not the best song you’ve ever heard, but it’s probably the best Psalm 7 song you’ve ever heard.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

Showing 181–192 of 246 results