Psalm Songs

Showing 49–60 of 102 results

  • Psalm 141: O Lord, I Call to You, Please Hear Me

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/Psalm-141_-O-Lord-I-Call-to-You.mp3

    A jazz Psalm is out of the sweet spot of many congregations, but this might be a good place to start. A one-note refrain is paired with straightforward metrical verses. If I were leading this in a congregation, I’d likely have them sing that simple eight-measure phrase only, leaving the verses to a soloist until it became familiar.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 143: O Lord, Hear My Prayer

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_143.mp3

    One doesn’t usually associate jazz with responsorial Psalms. But as you can hear, this song has everything a good responsorial Psalm needs: a quickly learnable refrain, verses that can expand or contract to match the length of the text, and clear harmonic movement to support the chant. Give it a try!

  • Psalm 145: My Mouth Will Speak the Praise of the Lord

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    http://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm_145-my_mouth.mp3

    The themes of God’s greatness, goodness, faithfulness, and righteousness in Psalm 145 are bookended by verses 1-2 and verse 21. In this musical setting, verse 21 becomes a refrain that follows two verses focused on God’s faithfulness and righteousness. Notice how the verse changes halfway through, with the lyrics switching from talking about God to praying to God. 

  • Psalm 146: Praise the Lord!

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_146-praise_the_lord.mp3

    Charles Freeman wrote this text for Psalm 146, an exuberant Psalm of trust and praise. When I sat down at the piano to write the music, I immediately heard Black Gospel. I wanted this song to sit comfortably between Andraé Crouch’s “Bless the Lord” and James Moore’s “Taste and See.”

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church, please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 149: Let God’s People Sing a New Song

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm149-let_gods_people.mp3

    As the Psalter ends, it erupts into a chorus of Hallelujahs and Praise the Lords, naming a plethora of instruments that should be used to make the praise even more glorious. This song follows suit, with strings, brass, harpsichord, flute, accordion, and saxophone all joining in. Of course, you don’t need all the instruments featured on the recording; you lead this with a worship band, guitar, or the piano accompaniment that’s available below.

    The song was featured on the Cardiphonia album The Songs of the Psalter, Vol 5.1, part of a series that covers the entire Psalter.

  • Psalm 15: Lord, May I Dwell with You?

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_015-lord_may_i_dwell.mp3

    Here, Psalm 15 becomes a sung prayer of devotion. The chorus is a prayer of aspiration, “Lord, may I dwell with you?” and the verses pray for the strength and guidance to live the godly life outlined in the Psalm. The music is in a simple, Taizé-like style, with verses chanted over the chorus. This also allows the chorus to be used independently as a scripture song, focusing on the deeper message of the Psalm: a desire to dwell in God’s presence, knowing God as a refuge and our true home.

    This hymn is a free download. If you sing this song in your church, please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 150: Hallel, Hallelujah!

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    http://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm_150-hallel_hallelujah.mp3

    The exuberance and repetition in this Psalm text led me to compose a Taizé style chorus, but in a regal, rather than meditative style. You’ll notice that the song is built on a repeated 10 measure phrase. This is unusual–music is normally written in divisions of four–but the irregular phrase length keeps the repeats from feeling banal. Also keeping the song’s motion moving forward is the unresolved final chord.

    This hymn is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 16: The Refuge of My Soul

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    [embed]http://musicblog.gregscheer.com/psalm_016-the_refuge_of_my_soul.mp3[/embed]

    This song chronicles a life from birth to death under God’s care.

    At first glance, it may seem like the song has little to do with the Psalm 16. It uses none of the “protect me, God” or “path of life” phrases that other settings of this Psalm use. Instead, it goes a layer deeper, into the Psalm’s structure.

    Samuel Terrien proposes that Psalm 16 is made up of 6 strophes, with the first three mirroring the last three. In broad strokes, the Psalm begins its focus on things of earth and moves toward heaven. As I meditated on the Psalm it suddenly struck me that it closely follows the span of human life. It is very clear in the last two strophes, which focus on the grave and eternal life. Working your way backward, you can see further life milestones: the growth of wisdom (strophe 4) and earthly blessings (strophe 3). The first two strophes are less clear, but with a bit of imagination, I recast the first strophe’s protection and refuge as the womb and the sacrifices to false gods in strophe two as the sins of youth. It’s easier to understand when you see the Psalm and my song side by side as in this PDF.

  • Psalm 17: Show Me the Wonder of Your Love

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_017-show_me_the_wonder_of_your_love.mp3

    In Psalm 17, the Psalmist is being pursued by enemies and calls to God for help. The six-part Psalm includes an initial appeal for God to hear, a proclamation of innocence, a petition (save me!), an accusation of the wicked, another petition, and a final word of confidence that God will save.

  • Psalm 18: I Love You, God My Lord

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    https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/psalm_18-i_love_you_god_my_lord.mp3

    In addition to being quite long, Psalm 18 presents the difficulty of wide-ranging content. It starts with praise for God’s strength and a plea for help, then extols God’s retribution of enemies, provides an overly flattering assessment of the Psalmist’s own piety, takes joy in the strength God gives the Psalmist, and ends with more praise for the victory God will give.

    Adam Carlill’s 20 verses do justice to the original while remaining accessible to modern ears. I added a refrain–it felt like the song needed something to break up all those verses. I could imagine a leader singing a few verses at a time and then handing it over to the congregation to sing the refrain.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

  • Psalm 19: The Heavens Declare God’s Glory

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    [audio mp3="https://gregscheer.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/psalm_019-the_heavens_declare.mp3"][/audio]

    Adapted from Psalm 19, this festive anthem is guaranteed to be a hit with choir and congregation alike. Parts are also available for Brass Quartet. “‘The Heavens Declare’ is one of the best anthems I have done in my ten years of singing…it is uplifting, inspiring, and joyful.” -Carole Anderson

  • Psalm 19: The Heavens Tell the Story

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    [embed]https://musicblog.gregscheer.com/the_heavens_tell.mp3[/embed]

    This song places Romans 1:18-32 beside Psalm 19:1-4 for a compelling musical exposition of God’s character revealed in nature.

    This leadsheet is a free download. If you sing this song in your church please report its use to CCLI or OneLicense.

Showing 49–60 of 102 results